Tag Archives: DIY

Fast and Easy Homemade Bread

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Baking my own bread has always been a rather intimidating prospect. I’m not sure why I became so afraid of it, perhaps visions of being up to my ears in sticky, flour-y dough, and kneading and proving for hours on end scared me off. I love to bake, but spending hours in the kitchen on complicated recipes isn’t my first choice of how to use my time. And now there’s a seven month old in the house, well, it’s just not an option anyway!

easy homemade no-knead yeasted organic bread preservative-free

Warm bread with homemade jam and organic butter – dee LISH!

An episode of  River Cottage (a fave UK lifestyle show of mine) inspired me to get my bread making on. I found what I thought was a good way to dip my toe in the dough at The Stone Soup; a foodie blog made just for me – and you no doubt! Jules creates and shares recipes with 5 ingredients, loves fresh and seasonal produce, and espouses the thrifty kitchen – what a trifecta! It is her recipe for Rustic Homemade Yeasted Bread (it’s titled Rustic Sourdough on the website, and even has a video!) that I’ve been loving up and raving about.

easy homemade no-knead yeasted organic bread preservative-free

Newly Mixed Dough

My first attempt at this bread was with generic brand flour and table salt. It was freaking amazing. I was so excited I think I told everyone I knew, who – lucky for me, bless ’em! – at least feigned interest. This makes my first loaf of Jules’ bread cost less than $1 in ingredients. Without horrible additives. Making my house smell divine.

And no kneading.

I know. Its true! I couldn’t believe it.

easy homemade no-knead yeasted organic bread preservative-free

Proved Dough @23hrs

I’m sure there are bread purists out there who will gasp and call me a philistine. That’s okay. The fact is, Jules has me baking fresh bread for my family, and that makes me very happy. I even do a little dance when I get it out of the oven. And when I’m eating it. Bub finds it all very entertaining. 🙂

easy homemade no-knead yeasted organic bread preservative-free

Proved Dough @ 23.5hrs

And. It takes 5 minutes to prepare. Mix in a bowl some flour, water, salt and yeast. Cover it with some cling wrap. Leave it for 12-24 hours. Tip it onto a floured surface; fold the edges in, place inside a floured tea towel for half an hour while you warm your pan and oven. Plonk the dough in the pan, cover, bake for half an hour; take off cover, bake a further 15 minutes. Slather on some butter and jam and congratulate yourself on baking a beautiful, fresh, uncontaminated loaf of bread.

easy homemade no-knead yeasted organic bread preservative-free

Almost done – taking lid off

Jules recommends using a round baking dish with a lid. I didn’t have one of those, so I used a shallow pie dish and some foil. Then I experimented with a loaf tin and foil, with superb results – primarily so I can freeze some (so I don’t keep going back for ‘just another slice’ – far too tempting!) and make a good sandwich. I did reduce the baking time though – 20 minutes then ten. Just give it a try with whatever you have, it’s very forgiving.

easy homemade no-knead yeasted organic bread preservative-free

Mmm fresh bread smells uh may zing

I usually make up the bread at night once bub is asleep and bake while we’re all eating breakfast. Today’s bread, however, sat for 23 hours before I turned it out of the bowl, and I think it tasted better when the yeast had extra time to ferment. I have started using organic flour; it is nicer, a bit more moist and springy. But when we have to tighten the purse strings, I’ll have no hesitation in using generic flour for the benefits of good, wholesome, homemade bread.

easy homemade no-knead yeasted organic bread preservative-free

First attempt – round loaf

While you’re over on The Stone Soup, have a good look around. I particularly love her approach to minimalist menu planning, and her checklist for a minimalist kitchen is great – excellent for people setting up a new house.

The next thing I’m going to do is make my own sourdough culture and make sourdough bread; I’m exploring fermenting my grains – like porridge, mmm – to make them more easily digestible a-la activating nuts, and to reduce the harmful effects of gluten.

easy homemade no-knead yeasted organic bread preservative-free

Makes a pretty good loaf-shaped bread

As someone with Hashimoto’s, gluten is something I need to kick. I have been able to do this in the past, and am going to wait until I finish breastfeeding until I quit again, mainly to spare bub from the detoxifying process that I’ll need to go through. However, any of you who have gluten intolerance or Coeliac’s disease will know just how sad gluten free bread is, and how expensive. It’s an ambition of mine to adapt this recipe to make a decent gluten free bread fresh at home, and I’ll share my results when I do. I’m hoping I can turn out something that is not just better than cardboard, but something that is yummy, inexpensive and that I can fit into my day. Spelt sourdough, perhaps? We’ll see!

Do you guys bake your own bread? If not, give this a try! You will not regret it. Let me know how you go!

UPDATE: SPELT IS NOT GLUTEN FREE! Fear not, I will pursue a yummy, no knead gluten free bread to bake at home, but Celiac.com has advised that it is not suitable for those with Coeliac disease. Spelt is much healthier than wheat flours, however, and is possibly okay for those with gluten intolerance, but if in doubt please be guided by advice from your health professional.

Nursing Breastfeeding Cover

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Breastfeeding in public is, I believe, one of the last taboos. What can be more natural than a mother feeding her child? I consider myself blessed to be able to breastfeed my bubba. It’s a choice that I feel all mothers should be supported to make (or not), even if its not always easy or possible, for the undeniable nutritional value it provides and the fact that its free and natural.*

Using DIY Nursing Cover

Using DIY Nursing Cover

Despite my view that mothers should be able to breastfeed whenever and wherever they need to, there are times when I am not comfortable to do so. For example, busy hospital foyers, shopping malls. Happily, in amongst the ever-growing and oft bewildering mountain of products thrust upon new parents are some practical and useful ideas, and I would include a nursing/breast feeding cover in the useful category. But not in the ‘sure! I’ll pay $100 for it’ category.

DIY Nursing Cover

DIY Nursing Breastfeeding Cover

In fact I find this nursing cover excellent if I’m in a sunny, drafty or cold position, and even just to help bub keep focused and not get so distracted!

Nursing Cover Pocket

Nursing Cover Pocket

I found this fabulous tutorial over at DIY Maternity to make a very easy cover. I love Megan’s website – lots of creative and thrifty ideas for re-purposing clothes; head over and check it out. It was even quick enough for me to make in short bursts during rest breaks, like when I was making Baby Bunting.

Nursing Cover Frills and Peek-A-Boo

Nursing Cover Frills and Peek-A-Boo corset boning

If you have a sewing machine, or know someone who does, this takes no time at all. I added a pocket to hold a cloth and a dummy, and ruffles just to make it pretty, but you don’t have to. I used some gorgeous fabric I picked up at Spotlight for $1/metre ages ago, and as my rather lame sewing machine can’t handle sewing through elastic as suggested in the tutorial, I used some press studs I already had for the behind-the-neck strap, which does the job just as nicely even if it isn’t quite as finessed.

Nursing Cover Peek-A-Boo and Neck Clasp

Nursing Cover Peek-A-Boo and Neck Clasp

I did buy 25cm of corset boning, to use as a little ‘peek-a-boo space’ to look at bubba while feeding, which cost me less than a dollar. (Megan’s tutorial has an even cheaper option!) So all together, this project *might* have cost me $2. And as far as time, well I’d say around an hour, if that. It really is just a hemmed rectangle and a strip of fabric to go around your neck!

What a gorgeous project to make for yourself or as a baby shower gift.

Nursing Cover Pretty Fabric

Isn’t this fabric with its see-through design pretty?

*I know that many mums can’t breastfeed for a range of reasons, just as some mums may choose to bottle feed. I completely respect the choices mothers make for themselves and their families and in no way do I wish to add to any guilt or expectation on all our beautiful mamas. Bonds between mother and baby are still strong and lasting when created through bottle feeding. The best thing to do is the thing that works. 🙂

Post script

I also didn’t intend for this to relate to the storm in a teacup that is the TIME cover and article on attachment parenting, however it seems somewhat inescapable to talk breastfeeding and not mention it. Personally, I feel the cover image was unnecessarily challenging; it didn’t convey the nurturing, natural, motherly elements that breastfeeding entails, to me at least. Having the little boy stand on a stool to reach his mother introduced far too much ‘milk maid’ than ‘mama’ imagery for mine. The mother’s hands on hips issued a somewhat salacious challenge, aiming to tap into a sexualisation of breastfeeding, which is one of the primary concerns and complaints of women breastfeeding in public. Despite the fact that the World Health Organisation recommends mothers breastfeed until their child is age two and beyond for full nutritional benefit, it is ultimately a personal decision made by mothers and their families. It was photographed to sell magazines and ignite debate – but did it help? I wonder…

Baby Bunting

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One of the most exciting things any expectant parent can do is set up their brand new little one’s bedroom. Certainly, for most pregnant women I know, decorating the nursery before baby arrives is a rite of passage; having something prepared physically gives a tangible element to what is happening unseen in our ginormous bellies.

Baby Bunting

Not all mums and dads can do this, for a range of reasons. I wasn’t able to do this as a result of severe pelvic instability. For five long months I lay in bed, staring at the ceiling, thinking of all the things I wish I was doing to get ready for my bubba, in my fantasy world of pregnancy.

In all my years of singledom, and those early fantasies of starting a family when I fell for my man, I had an idyllic vision of what I might be like as a pregnant Beck. I would be walking, changing my yoga to suit my growing belly, still going to parties and gigs and the footy “to get baby used to noises,” and crafting my little hand-knitted socks off.

Baby Bunting

By week eight of my pregnancy, this vision began to blur. Then by week 16 it was edited and left on the cutting room floor as I finished work early and began a regimen of icing my poor pelvis every 2 hours, getting a breakfast/lunch/snacks picnic from my lovely husband for they day, researching mobility aids for me instead of knitting patterns for my little one.

Baby Bunting

Toward the end of my pregnancy, I had little choice but to ramp up the painkillers to start preparing my body for childbirth. One thing, mercifully, that I began to be able to do, was to sit up in a chair for about 20 minutes at a time, resting in between for a few hours.

So, with this new found time, I decided to sew!

Small Fabric Canvas

I found this gorgeous tutorial over at this wonderful blog that showed the loveliest, easiest way to make bunting. As I couldn’t paint the walls, a small-scale project that would add some colour into the room seemed a great idea.

My hubby would set up my sewing machine for me, and I’d maneouvre the wheelchair in under the table, and sew. Slowly, deliberately, not always very well, but it was the most exciting thing in the world for me to be doing something creative, productive and for my soon to be baby.

Nursery Corner

With some of the left over fabric, I covered some stretched canvas frames, in an effort to cover more of the walls.

Of course, being the crazy lass I am, now that bub is here and I am well on the road to recovering my mobility, I’ve decided that the colours “just don’t suit baby,” and I’m going to make some more in the cooler colours that my little angel seems to sit with so comfortably. And when I do, I’ll most definitely share the project with you!

Large Fabric Canvas

If you have kidlets, how did you set up your nursery? Before or after baby was born? Did you make anything for your little bundle? I’d love to hear your stories!